family, life

A Special Thursday

I apologize to those of you who have read this before. I’ve actually posted it two other times . . . for sentimental reasons. Thank you for indulging me. Happy Easter to those celebrating and have a great weekend everyone.

Some people might remember their passed-away loved ones, on special days like their birthday, or on the day they died. I tend to remember my Grandma on this Thursday every year. It’s not her birthday which is September 13th, nor is it the day she died, December 4th.  It’s also not this date, April 13th, that has any significance. It is today … a Holy day … the Thursday before Easter, that always brings back sweet memories of my Grandma. Continue reading “A Special Thursday”

life, thoughts

Seventy-Seven Years and then Some

Life is so difficult these days, isn’t it? I mean, they had it so much easier years ago.

Continue reading “Seventy-Seven Years and then Some”

family, Food, life

Cavatelli

50skitchenThis is the second installment of a day in the kitchen with mom.  Only this time, it was our other mom.

My husband had been wanting to spend time with each of our mom’s in the kitchen, and a few weeks after he baked apple slices with his mom, he asked my mom, V, to teach him how to make pasta from scratch.

Continue reading “Cavatelli”

life, writing

The Sweet Revolting Development

(Originally posted on February 15, 2012.)

by Lori DiNardi     

After being dealt a bad hand of cards, Nana grumbled, “This shouldn’t happen to a dog.”

Grandma used her usual phrase, “Wouldn’t that frost you?”

Continue reading “The Sweet Revolting Development”

holidays, life

Memories in Present Tense

~ Shopping with my laughing Grandma who includes strangers to join in.
~ Peeling off heavy winter coats inside the mall.
~ Bundling back up with those same coats, plus scarfs and gloves to ready ourselves for the cold blast on the way back out of the mall.

mits candy Continue reading “Memories in Present Tense”

life

The Sweet Revolting Development

by Lori DiNardi     

After being dealt a bad hand of cards, Nana grumbled, “This shouldn’t happen to a dog.”

Grandma used her usual phrase, “Wouldn’t that frost you?”

All four of my grandparents played a game of Continental Rummy at the table in Mom’s gold and brown kitchen. If the cards they held kept coming up bad, an eruption of Italian swear words echoed throughout the room. Continue reading “The Sweet Revolting Development”