Food, life

Eating Flowers

In our garden, the tomatoes aren’t doing so well. We are getting some, but not like last year. The heat stress is causing them to die or come up with dark spots.


The good news is, our other vegetables have been fruitful and we haven’t had to buy many at the grocery store. Below is Swiss chard with a few tomatoes.


There are some flowers that grow in our garden as well. Can you tell from the below photos what kind they are?



On the Food Network and Cooking Channel, I’ve seen chef’s cook and eat these flowers before, so I decide to give it a try.

We stuffed them with seasoned ricotta cheese, dipped them in egg and flour, then fried them.


Holy Cow were they delicious. I must admit though, the flower itself didn’t have much flavor, so the cheese made the dish (sorry I didn’t get enough photos to show the inside).


You probably figured out what flowers we cooked and ate, but in case you didn’t, they grow on the plant with the below vegetable.


Now ‘dat’s a zucchini, am I right?Β Zucchini flowers are quite edible and our garden has dozens of them. We’ve fried them a few times now, and tried different fillings like Philadelphia cream cheese and mozzarella.

Have you ever tried to cook an usual dish? If so, what was it and how did it turn out? If you haven’t cooked one, what unusual dishes have you eaten?

25 thoughts on “Eating Flowers”

    1. Wow, I checked out your blog and you really have a green thumb. It’s my husband who gets things growing for me around here. I do recommend the flowers the way we fried them. Very delicious. Thanks for stopping by and commenting. πŸ™‚

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  1. Your vegetable harvest looks lovely Lori and I’m glad you’re enjoying it with some new recipes. I’ve eaten stuffed zucchini (we call them courgettes) flowers a few times in Greece – a long time ago – and they were very tasty.

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    1. Hi Andrea. I only find out about different foods from TV. LOL Don’t get out much. Eating flowers in Greece sounds much more exciting. How awesome that you got to go there. Thank you for sharing.

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  2. Wow! Looks yummy! I’ve never cooked a flower before.
    Sorry about your tomatoes. My brother had trouble with his this year.

    I haven’t cooked anything unusual lately. I haven’t done much cooking at all. I’ve been into soups despite the heat.

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    1. I’ve been hearing so many people say that their tomatoes aren’t doing as well this year. It’s definitely the heat. Thanks for sharing, L.

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  3. I have cooked and eaten so many unusual meals it’s hard to remember. Had blueberry chicken sausage for breakfast the past two days. Very odd! Your cheese stuffed zucchini blossoms look delicious.

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    1. I have a confession to make. It’s not my garden. It’s my husband’s. I do not have a green thumb.

      As far as watermark, most Microsoft computers come with the Paint program and I do it in there. I open a photo in there, click on the font button, then stretch out a text box to write in over the picture. Click save and viola!

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        1. No. iPhone won’t have it. I never use my phone for computer stuff. It’s an old Windows phone, and I hate google. I have my reasons. πŸ˜‰

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  4. Your cherry tomatoes look pretty good, Lori. I’ve never liked zucchini. I remember crying when my mother tried to make me eat it…I drove her crazy with my picky eating habits. Once, while in Venezuela, I ate some kind of animal brain…I thought it was lobster. πŸ™‚

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    1. I think I’ve heard of chef’s cooking cow brain. I wonder if that’s what you ate? How did it taste? Why were you in Venezuela? Sad what’s happening there now.

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  5. I’ve experimented with zucchinis before and I agree that they make excellent vehicles for fillings and frying. πŸ™‚ Yum!

    The most unusual thing I had to eat was an eyeball (probably sheep or goat) in a bowl of soup at a Bedouin camp – it was particularly given to me because I was honoured as a guest. I just swallowed it – no biting or chewing – and then proclaimed that it was delicious. The soup itself was wonderful, but the eyeball was disconcerting to say the least.

    It looks like your garden is doing well for the most part even if the tomatoes aren’t the best. It seems like it’s been extraordinarily hot everywhere.

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    1. Umm, I’d much rather eat a flower than an eyeball. I still would love to read about your travel adventures. Where was this Bedouin camp?

      Thanks for sharing, Lynette.

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      1. Yes, I should do some travel writing. Actually, I was a guest of your ambassador to Saudi Arabia and we were invited to a gov’t minister’s family camp. It was right after the first Gulf war and I was doing some contract work. Very interesting but rather touchy work.

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  6. I was going to guess that it’s a flower of a squash plant. I was on the right track, but hadn’t guessed zucchini. Be sure to pick those zucchinis before they get too big. They are best when they’re the size of a cucumber. You’re doing great with your garden! I’m having similar tomato troubles so don’t feel bad.

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    1. I have a confession to make. It’s not my garden. It’s my husband’s. I have no green thumb. I keep telling him to clip the zucchini when they’re smaller, but he says that they seem to get that big overnight! He just cut another jumbo one this morning.

      Yeah, I’ve been hearing from lots of people that their garden tomatoes are struggling, too. Heat seems to be everywhere this year. Stay cool and breathe easy over there.

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